Stand up, speak out

“This isn’t about my kids, yeah, this battle is about every single child.  If there’s going to be a battle then let it be me and not my son.” – Tommy Robinson

Tommy Robinson has over a period of time managed to galvanise an amazing crowd of people, people who care about their country, people who care about stopping the rape of their children and people who believed they were going to make a difference by joining this movement, the people’s movement.

They believed they were going to make a difference by getting justice for the victims/survivors of the rape jihad and hold all those who failed them to account.  And some thought they were making a difference by donating money, which they wrongly believed was given to the victims and survivors.

Since the UK Against Hate event which was held in June 2017, in Manchester, the movement has grown from galvanising a crowd of around 5000 to the first Free Tommy event held in June 2018, in London where there was an estimated crowd of around 10,000 people in attendance.

These events have always been peaceful, well as peaceful as they can be with such large crowds.

The UK Against Hate in Manchester was the first time there was such a huge crowd, the chants of ‘Oh Tommy, Tommy’ could be heard and the atmosphere was electric.  I was there in the heart of that crowd, and I felt safe.  We were kettled and made to walk alongside the counter-protest who were throwing bottles and still the message was loud and clear – ‘Do not retaliate, do not fight.’ It was a peaceful and silent walk in memory of all those who had lost their lives in the Manchester Arena bombing.

When the event was over, Tommy again asked the crowds not to cause any trouble.

At the first Free Tommy event, in June last year, Kevin Carroll urged the crowd to make their way home peacefully, to cause no trouble and to remember that their behaviour was in Tommy’s name.  The majority of the crowd listened and made their way from the event without causing any shame to the movement or to Tommy’s name.  As I said, there is always a small number that behaves like thugs.

It is very important to bear in mind that Tommy has always called for peaceful demonstrations.

So what happened at this year’s Free Tommy event, on Saturday 3rdAugust?

Where was the message of it being peaceful and no fighting?  Where was the announcement that how you behave is a reflection on Tommy and will bring shame on the movement?  Where was the massive crowd of thousands that always turn out to support Tommy?

Nowhere it seems.  People are waking up.

I have spoken to many people who attended and who left after the first two speakers had given their speeches.  The usual happy atmosphere they had experienced was not there at this event.  They felt it was charged with an underlying threat of violence.  That is not what Tommy has spent the last two years building, and that is not what the movement is about.

There are far too many people in the movement staying silent while knowing how damaged it has become.  Staying silent because they are too scared to speak out for fear of being ostracised or harassed. Staying silent because they are PayPal patriots.  You know who you are and if you cared about Tommy, and if you cared about the movement, you would not stay silent.  You would speak out because only by speaking out can it be fixed.

I won’t stay silent.  I am speaking out.

To blame me for the division in the movement is pathetic. The division has been there for a while.  People are sickened by what they are seeing, the hangers-on all wanting to get a seat on the top of the party bus.

The bus that was supposed to be driven into towns and cities where the rape jihad had been ignored and the Rape of Britain documentary, which was to be shown on screens on the side of the bus, has instead become a party bus and everyone is welcome on board.

No security checks or any vetting, which has meant that what goes on in the bus, has most definitely not stayed on the bus.

We all are aware of what happens at parties, and the party bus is no different.

The people who have reached out to me and told me what they saw on that bus has really made them question what the movement has become.

“It was about highlighting the rape of our girls; it was about the Islamification of our country and how we take steps to tackle these issues. It was never about attacking the police.  I saw a policeman’s head spilt wide open when someone from our side threw a bottle at him.  I saw a random cyclist get smacked, for no reason.  And I saw fights, our side fighting each other because they were so drunk they didn’t even realise and wrongly assumed they were Antifa.”

The rape of our children is why I joined the movement. It’s why I risked alienating online and real life friends by sharing a platform with Tommy. I was called a racist, a bigot and a Nazi for doing so.  I didn’t care because raising awareness and highlighting the abuse of children, especially in the Muslim community, was far more important than any label they smeared me with.  Tommy was highlighting the rape jihad, and the rape of white children and I chose to speak about the Muslim children who were also victims.

It’s not wrong to ask what the movement has done for the victims and survivors. It’s not wrong to ask where is their crowdfunding, donations, or documentary. And it’s not wrong to speak out about those who are actually damaging the movement regardless of whether Tommy is in jail or not.

No matter what they tell you, Tommy will be ashamed of Saturday’s “Free Tommy” circus.